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Keratoconus

What is Keratoconus?

Keratoconus is a vision disorder that occurs when the normally round cornea becomes thin and cone shaped.

The abnormal shape of the cornea prevents the light entering the eye from being focused correctly on the retina and causes distortion of vision.

Keratoconus may progress for 10-20 years and then slow in its progression.

Each eye may be affected differently. As keratoconus progresses, the cornea bulges more and vision may become more distorted.

In a small number of cases, the cornea will swell and cause a sudden and significant decrease in vision. The swelling occurs when the strain of the cornea's protruding cone-like shape causes a tiny crack to develop.

Symptoms of Keratoconus

In its earliest stages, the symptoms of keratoconus are slight blurring, distortion of vision, nearsightedness, astigmatism, and increased sensitivity to glare and light. In rare cases, a sudden, significant decrease in vision will occur. The sudden and significant decrease in vision is caused by swelling of the the cornea. The swelling may last for weeks or months.

Treatment options for Keratoconus

Unfortunately, medications will not prevent keratoconus from becoming worse. If the cornea swells, eye drops will provide temporary relief

Eyeglasses and soft contact lenses may be used to correct the mild nearsightedness and astigmatism that is caused by the early stages for keratoconus.

In rare cases, surgery to replace the cornea is needed.

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