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Lyme Disease

What is Lyme Disease?

Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by a skin rash, joint inflammation, and flu-like symptoms.

Lyme disease is also called Borreliosis. It was first described in the United States in the town of Old Lyme, Connecticut in 1975.

Most cases of Lyme disease occurs in the Northeast, upper Midwest, and along the Pacific coast of the United States. Mice and deer are the most commonly infected animals that serve as host to the tick.

Most infections occur in the late spring, summer, and early fall.

What Causes Lyme Disease?

Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. It is transmitted by the bite of a deer tick.

Risks of Developing Lyme Disease

You will increase your risk of developing Lyme Disease if you:

  • live or work in residential areas surrounded by tick-infested woods or overgrown brush
  • walk in high grasses
  • have a pet that may carry ticks home.

Symptoms of Lyme Disease

There are many symptoms. The most common symptoms are:

  • A flat or slightly raised red lesion at the site of the tick bite
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Lethargy
  • Muscle pains
  • Stiff neck
  • Joint inflammation in the knees and other large joints
  • Itching

Can Lyme Disease be Treated?

Yes. The most common treatment is antibiotics.

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