Link to MamasHealth.com

Infections

Adenovirus
Anthrax
Avian Flu
Battle the Cold
Black Fever
Bronchitis

Chicken Pox
Cholera
Colds and Cruises
Cold Season
Coxsackie Virus
Croup
Cytomegalovirus
Dengue Fever
Diphtheria
Ear Infection
Ebola
Epiglottitis
Fight the Flu
Flu
Flu Vaccine
Glandular Fever
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
Laryngitis
Leprosy
Lice
Lyme Disease
Mad Cow Disease
Malaria
Measles
Meningitis
Mono
Mumps
Pertussis
Pink Eye
Pinworms
Pneumonia
Polio
Rabies
Rheumataic Fever
Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
RSV
Sarcoidosis
SARS
Shigella Enteritis
Scarlet Fever
Smallpox
Sore Throat
Stomach Flu
Strep Throat
Super Infections
Swine Flu
Tetanus
Thrush
Tonsilitis
Tuberculosis
Typhoid Fever
Valley Fever
West Nile Virus
Whooping Cough
Yellow Fever

Links

Promote your product

Support Groups


Whooping Cough

What is Whooping Cough?

Whooping cough is an infection of the respiratory system characterized by severe coughing spells that end in a "whooping" sound when the person breathes in.

Whooping cough can occur at any age, but is is most common in unimmunized children and in infants under 1 year of age.

Whooping cough is also called Pertussis.

Is Whooping Cough Contagious?

Yes. Whooping cough is very contagious. The bacteria that causes whooping cough is bacteria spread from person to person through tiny drops of fluid from an infected person's nose or mouth.

People with whooping cough are most contagious during the earliest stages of the illness up to about 2 weeks after the cough begins.

What Causes Whooping Cough?

Whooping cough is caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis Bordetella pertussis is also called B. pertussis.

Symptoms of Whooping Cough

The initial symptoms of whooping cough are:

  • runny nose
  • sneezing
  • mild cough
  • low fever

After about 1 week, the dry, irritating cough evolves into coughing spells that last for about one minute. During the coughing spell, the person may become red or purple. After the coughing spell, the person may vomit or make a whooping sound when breathing in.

How is Whooping Cough Treated?

The most common treatments are: antibiotics and medications to reduce fever.

Can Whooping Cough be Prevented?

Yes. If you take the whooping cough vaccine, you will lower your risk of contracting whooping cough. The whooping cough vaccine is part of the DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis) immunization. DTaP immunizations are routinely given in five doses before a child's sixth birthday.

We'll teach you how to #LiveTo100!

Join our newsletter!

Accessibility Policy| Terms Of Use| Privacy Policy| Advertise with Us| Contact Us| Newsletter

RSS| Sitemap| Careers

Mamas Health Inc. does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms of Use.

©2000 - 2013 MamasHealth, Inc.™. All rights reserved