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Stomach Ulcer Diet

Diets for Stomach Ulcers

This diet is a guideline that may help to decrease stomach ulcer pain, gastric irritation and excessive gastric acid secretion. This diet may also help prevent uncomfortable stomach ulcer side effects such as heartburn.

***This is only a guideline. Before changing your diet, please consult your doctor.

  • Eat three small meals and three snacks evenly spaced throughout the day. It is important to avoid periods of hunger or overeating.
  • Eat slowly and chew foods well.
  • Be relaxed at mealtime.
  • Sit up while eating and for 1 hour afterward.
  • Avoid eating within 3 hours before bedtime. Bedtime snacks can cause gastric acid secretion during the night.
  • Cut down on caffeine-containing foods and beverages, citrus and tomato products, and chocolate if these foods cause discomfort.
  • Include a good source of protein (milk, meat, egg, cheese, etc.) at each meal and snack.
  • Antacids should be taken in the prescribed dose, One-hour and 3 hours after meals and prior to bedtime. This regimen is most likely to keep the acidity of the stomach at the most stable and lowest level.
  • Milk and cream feedings should not be used as antacid therapy. Although milk protein has an initial neutralizing effect on gastric acid, it is also a very potent stimulator. Hourly feedings of milk have been shown to produce a lower pH than three regular meals.
  • Caffeine-containing beverages (coffee, tea, and cola drinks) and decaffeinated coffee cause increased gastric acid production but may be taken in moderation at or near mealtime, if tolerated.

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